Shane Falco

Source Notes #15 (Institutional)

In Uncategorized on February 20, 2009 at 9:05 am

Title: Overview of Social Security Employer No-Match Letters Process

Summary: The Social security Administration is an independent organization of the U.S. government.  They primarily deal with administering social security, and they govern the taxes taken out of pay checks.  They send out no-match letters to employers to verify employee documents of identification. 

Topic: Should employers be held accountable by the Department of Homeland Security for hiring illegal immigrants?

Category: Institutional

What is it? Informational web page
Location: http://www.socialsecurity.gov/legislation/nomatch2.htm
Accessed: 2/20,09

Support: IRS, Department of Treasury

The SSA processes wages as an agent of the IRS.  The SSA follows regulations provided by the Department of Treasury.

Audience and Agenda: According to quantcast.com, socialsecurity.gov receives roughly 3.4 million views a month.  They are funded by the U.S. government.  They are responsible for leading and managing America’s Social Security programs.

Usefulness:
This is an informational web page that describes the no-match letter process.  The Social Security Administration sends out letters to employers.  The W-2 wage reports on file need to match the employees name and Social Security number.  If the information doesn’t match, then there is a problem, and a no-match letter is sent out by the SSA.  The W-2 forms need to match in order for the IRS to be able to send appropriate tax returns.  The Department of Homeland Security needs to get involved with the SSA.  These no-match letters can be helpful in determining problems with incorrect I.D. information.  This could also help discover counterfeit identification used by illegal immigrants.  Using the no-match process may be more effective than programs like E-Verify. It would help get accurate information on record with the U.S. government.

Works cited:
wikipedia, google, SSA, Quantcast

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  1. […] Source Notes #15 (Institutional) […]

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